THE WAVELENGTH COMPOSITION OF LIGHT

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Reblogged from thegestianpoet
vulturehooligan:

  Cornelis van Spaendonck, Still Life of Flowers, 1793. Oil on canvas. 
Cornelis van Spaendonck was born in the Dutch city of Tilburg, but by the age of seventeen he had followed his older brother Gerardus, also a gifted still life artist, to Paris, where they both enjoyed long and successful careers. Cornelis, for example, was director of the great Sèvres porcelain works.
Although Spaendonck’s work is removed in time by more than a century from the height of flower painting initiated by painters like Ambrosius Bosschaert the Elder and Roelant Saverij during the so-called golden age, it shares with the work of these early artists a great technical virtuosity, finish, and sensitivity to lighting in its depiction of a lush cornucopia of flowers that spill over the canvas. Given the later date of Spaendonck’s work, it is generally agreed among scholars that less meaning should be read into the presence and placement of individual flowers, and felt that viewers should merely experience the enjoyment of nature’s generosity and the artist’s skill. Still, it does not seem possible to entirely discount the symbolism of sleep, death, and rebirth in the respective presentation of poppies, lilacs, and morning glories here; along with these, the mindfulness urged by the forget-me-nots at the very center of the composition may assert a commemorative function for this picture. Or, perhaps Spaendonck intended a clever to the tale of the goddess Demeter from classical mythology (whose flower is the poppy) whose loss of her daughter Persephone to Hades, lord of the underworld, for half of each year, was the ancient explanation for the cyclical death and renewal of the natural world in the four seasons.
via the Johnson Museum of Art

vulturehooligan:

  Cornelis van Spaendonck, Still Life of Flowers, 1793. Oil on canvas. 

Cornelis van Spaendonck was born in the Dutch city of Tilburg, but by the age of seventeen he had followed his older brother Gerardus, also a gifted still life artist, to Paris, where they both enjoyed long and successful careers. Cornelis, for example, was director of the great Sèvres porcelain works.

Although Spaendonck’s work is removed in time by more than a century from the height of flower painting initiated by painters like Ambrosius Bosschaert the Elder and Roelant Saverij during the so-called golden age, it shares with the work of these early artists a great technical virtuosity, finish, and sensitivity to lighting in its depiction of a lush cornucopia of flowers that spill over the canvas. Given the later date of Spaendonck’s work, it is generally agreed among scholars that less meaning should be read into the presence and placement of individual flowers, and felt that viewers should merely experience the enjoyment of nature’s generosity and the artist’s skill. Still, it does not seem possible to entirely discount the symbolism of sleep, death, and rebirth in the respective presentation of poppies, lilacs, and morning glories here; along with these, the mindfulness urged by the forget-me-nots at the very center of the composition may assert a commemorative function for this picture. Or, perhaps Spaendonck intended a clever to the tale of the goddess Demeter from classical mythology (whose flower is the poppy) whose loss of her daughter Persephone to Hades, lord of the underworld, for half of each year, was the ancient explanation for the cyclical death and renewal of the natural world in the four seasons.

via the Johnson Museum of Art

(Source: thegestianpoet, via mikey547)

Reblogged from tylenold

tylenold:

it’s not you’re* or your*. it’s all Mine. everything is Mine

(via orgasm)

Reblogged from fashionfever
Reblogged from realitytvgifs

realitytvgifs:

Happy Earth Day!

(via zackisontumblr)

Reblogged from tibets

(Source: tibets, via loliconic)

Reblogged from lolcuteanimals
accaern:

lymphonodge:

TINY DOLPH

*the tiniest voice* surfbort

accaern:

lymphonodge:

TINY DOLPH

*the tiniest voice* surfbort

(Source: lolcuteanimals, via loliconic)

Reblogged from aerbor
aerbor:

ELINOR CARUCCI

aerbor:

ELINOR CARUCCI

(via trainquilgod)

Reblogged from graouli
graouli:

White Stripes in the back room of Club Shinjuku Jam, Tokyo, to an audience of 10–20 people, in their first Japanese tour.

graouli:

White Stripes in the back room of Club Shinjuku Jam, Tokyo, to an audience of 10–20 people, in their first Japanese tour.

(via 17yr)

Reblogged from getofftheinternerd
meanplastic:

money is the anthem of success, so put on mascara and your party dress

meanplastic:

money is the anthem of success, so put on mascara and your party dress

(Source: getofftheinternerd, via zackisontumblr)

Reblogged from sofapizza

(Source: sofapizza, via juliejigsaw)

Reblogged from sandandglass
Reblogged from mkaiser323

skyrover9:

mkaiser323:

It’s fun to chant “Bloody Mary” into your car’s side mirror three times and watch her jog and try to keep up.

Being a dick even to demons

(via orgasm)

Reblogged from rootingforyoubaby
Reblogged from symmetrism

ninjaotta:

sokpoppet:

nicolakay:

oh-no-zo:

symmetrism:

Art’s great nudes have gone skinny

Italian artist Anna Utopia Giordano has created a visual re-imagination of historic nude paintings, had the subjects conformed their bodies to what the 21st century considers an ideal of beauty. The results are revealing—and quite shocking in what they say about the modern attitude toward women’s bodies.

This is genius

This makes me uncomfortable

the birth of venus looks so sad because her beautiful curves have all wasted away :(

(via livinginthedeadsea)

Reblogged from muczynski

(Source: muczynski, via b10od)